2017 Jeep Grand Cherokee Trailhawk V-6 Reviews

2017 Jeep Grand Cherokee Trailhawk V-6 Reviews


2017 Jeep Grand Cherokee Trailhawk V-6 Reviews
2017 Jeep Grand Cherokee Trailhawk V-6 Reviews

2017 Jeep Grand Cherokee Trailhawk V-6 - The Jeep Grand Cherokee is essentially best among moderate size SUVs when the street underneath isn't really a street. All things considered, there's a distinction between being equipped for playing out an assignment and being reason worked to ace it. Keeping in mind each Wrangler is destined to play in the earth, none of the 10—yes, 10—diverse Grand Cherokee models offered for 2016 were designed particularly for the action whereupon Jeep assembled its image. Such a model appears like an easy decision, if for no other explanation than to give Renegade Trailhawk and Cherokee Trailhawk drivers something to climb to.

Be that as it may, more imperative, it would gesture to Jeep's ardent rough terrain lovers, some of whom might age, including posterity, or for reasons unknown may discover the Wrangler Unlimited a bit excessively austere. Jeep surely has had the know-how (and the vast majority of the current parts) to assemble a wonder such as this from the beginning, and it happened with the revealing of the 2017 Grand Cherokee Trailhawk the previous spring. Presently, we've handled trails in one, drove it to our West Coast base, and led our instrumented testing.


2017 Jeep Grand Cherokee Trailhawk V-6
2017 Jeep Grand Cherokee Trailhawk V-6

This isn't the first run through Jeep has offered the Grand Cherokee in Trailhawk shape; such a rendition initially showed up as a 2013 model, bragging the Grand Cherokee's most refined rough terrain parts, a liberal yet not extravagant level of common luxuries, and expressive twists proportionate to pants and a wool shirt. At around $42,000, the 2013 cost was sufficiently sensible that people who spend their weekends in a tent by a pit fire still may manage the cost of it. Yet, the Trailhawk discreetly vanished when the facelifted 2014 model arrived.

As some time recently, the Trailhawk begins with the best go romping gear in the Jeep pantheon: the Quadra-Drive II four-wheel-drive framework with its two-speed exchange case and Selec-Terrain dial, alongside an electronically controlled restricted slip raise differential, slope plunge and - rising control (HDC), a full range of slide plates, and Jeep's clever rough terrain application. The standard air springs can ascend to give up to 10.8 inches of ground freedom (0.4 crawl more than some other air-spring-prepared Grand Cherokee) or lower the vehicle to straightforwardness entrance and departure. The moving stock is no joke: Kevlar-strengthened 265/60R-18 Goodyear Wrangler All-Terrain Adventure off-road tires wrapped around aluminum wheels with matte-dark additions.

Our test case was controlled by FCA's omnipresent 3.6-liter Pentastar V-6, making 295 strength and 260 lb-ft of torque, with an eight-speed programmed doing the moving. The 360-hp 5.7-liter Hemi V-8 and the 3.0-liter turbo-diesel V-6 with 240 strength and 420 lb-ft of torque are accessible also.

The Trailhawk's main goal is obvious at first look. Chrome has been ousted from the headlamp bezels, grille, mirrors, rooftop rails, guards, and identifications for argent dark or dark, while two red tow snares and matte-dark hood decals outwardly attach it to different Trailhawks in Jeep's portfolio. A few of us could manage without the hood stickers, yet the Trailhawk is still nice looking, even in our case's splendid Redline Pearl paint—an intense shading for a major SUV to pull off. What's more, there's something about an absence of chrome that makes a truck look great when it's messy.


2017 Jeep Grand Cherokee Trailhawk V-6 Interior
2017 Jeep Grand Cherokee Trailhawk V-6 Interior

Things are significantly more exceptional inside, where practically everything other than some chrome trim pieces and red sewing is rendered in strong dark (the main shading accessible). The Trailhawk acquires a few things from higher up the Grand Cherokee natural pecking order, for example, a 506-watt premium sound framework and FCA's 8.4-creep Uconnect touchscreen infotainment unit, in spite of the fact that by a wide margin the best overhauls are the profoundly reinforced front game seats from the Grand Cherokee SRT, upholstered here in calfskin and microsuede. Our illustration likewise bragged a $450 UConnect route overhaul and the $2695 Trailhawk Luxury bundle that includes HID programmed headlamps, LED mist and running lights, a power-flexible guiding segment, and an all encompassing sunroof.

On a winding, shut, earth course that Jeep graphed through the Santa Monica Mountains, we could perceive how the entire bundle meets up. As anyone might expect, the Trailhawk took care of all that we hurled its way, from crossing body-twisting stunned trenches to climbing steep, residue secured slopes to exploring down considerably more extreme slants on the rear. With HDC's mix of slope rising and - plunge control—the rough terrain likeness voyage control—the Trailhawk kept a consistent pace over everything except the craggiest of rough ways while those marvelous seats secured us immovably set up. The most momentous part of driving on that differing landscape was the way little we needed to consider it. Keeping in mind it might never feel normal to keep one's foot off the brake pedal amid soak plunges (particularly when swinging from the safety belts and seeing only earth through the windshield), our powerlessness to coordinate the unfaltering quality of the slope plummet control all alone while dropping an especially soak review strikingly represented the innovation's advantages.

Rough terrain situated vehicles as a rule perform more ineffectively than their on-street partners in our instrumented tests, and the Trailhawk is no special case. Controlled by a similar motor and weighing inside 100 pounds of a 2016 Grand Cherokee Summit V-6 4x4 we already tried, this Trailhawk was a half-second slower to 60 mph, at 7.6 seconds, and trailed by a similar sum in the quarter-mile (15.9 seconds and 88 mph). Manual movements yielded our best times, as the eight-speed programmed tended to upshift well shy of the V-6's redline. We additionally figured out how to actuate the Sport mode upon startup, which alters move indicates and throttle settings keep the 5077-pound brute on a fleeter balance, regardless of the possibility that it dragged our watched efficiency down to a wretched 15 mpg.

Other target test numbers likewise were dull. The Trailhawk's 198-foot 70-mph-to-zero braking separation is 17 feet longer than the Summit's, and its 0.71-g skidpad figure trails the Summit's 0.76 g (which itself is nothing to brag about). Accuse the tires—the Kevlar-fortified elastic doesn't precisely paw a cleared street, coming about in bargained execution as well as unclear controlling, as well. On the flipside, ride quality is firm yet amazingly edified for anything so competent, and the tire clamor at roadway velocities is hardly any louder than that of more road amicable elastic.


2017 Jeep Grand Cherokee Trailhawk V-6 Engine
2017 Jeep Grand Cherokee Trailhawk V-6 Engine

The 2017 Trailhawk begins at $43,990—the third least expensive of the 10 Grand Cherokee models for 2017—which is $1700 not exactly the cushy Overland yet $5100 more than the Limited. The value swelled to $50,125 once the previously mentioned additional items were included, in addition to another $900 for Mopar rooftop rails, $595 for blind side cautioning and back cross-movement identification, and $1495 for the Jeep Active Safety bundle (versatile voyage control, forward-crash cautioning, path takeoff cautioning, and parallel/opposite stopping help). In spite of the fact that it appears like a strong entirety, at any rate you get much more ability to run with the extra tech and familiar luxuries. Also, perhaps the Trailhawk will stick around for over one year this time.


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